IAM Patent 1000 2022

Patents are essential business commodities and knowing how to obtain, enforce and monetise them has become mission critical. The IAM Patent 1000 has firmly established itself as the definitive ‘go-to’ resource for those seeking to identify world-class, private practice patent expertise.

Philippines

The Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines (IPOPHL) has been keeping busy in its continuing bid to promote and protect IP rights. Seeking to broaden the local business’ IP capabilities, IPOPHL signed a memorandum with the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry to train micro, small and medium-sized enterprises in...

Read more

The Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines (IPOPHL) has been keeping busy in its continuing bid to promote and protect IP rights. Seeking to broaden the local business’ IP capabilities, IPOPHL signed a memorandum with the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry to train micro, small and medium-sized enterprises in filing patent applications under the international route. Further, the office signed a memorandum of understanding with the Japan Content Overseas Distribution Association, with the aim of doubling down on piracy and copyright infringement. Further, IPOPHL organised the first Philippine International Copyright Summit, which sought to promote the local creative industries and raise awareness of the importance of copyright protection. On the legislative side, the office continues to push for the modernisation of the IP Code of the Philippines, which has been in force since 1998. At last, the 18th Congress of the Philippines is conducting public hearings over three pending house bills seeking to address this issue. House Bill 8620, which is most in line with IPOPHL expectations, aims to amend the code by introducing a parallel-protection system and allow for the provisional filing of patents. This would expand the office’s organisational structure and grant it police powers with regard to pirated and counterfeit goods. House Bill 1597 proposes an extension of the protection period to 15 years and an increased penalty for IP violations, while House Bill 8062 seeks to overhaul the IP Code entirely.

Show less

Get unlimited access to all IAM content