The coining of the term ‘patent troll’ was a key moment in what eventually became a major backlash against non-practising entities (NPE) in the United Sates. Originally thought up within Intel in 1999, the catchy (some would say prejudicial) moniker was soon being employed by leading media outlets. Even if juries or newspaper readers do not know patents, they have almost certainly heard about trolls - and they know that they are "bad". While some judges have banned the term from their courtrooms, studies suggest it is still widely used in news coverage.

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